Neckless ovoid jar with blue-painted decoration - ROM2018_16324_23

ROM2018_16324_23

Neckless ovoid jar with blue-painted decoration

Medium:Ceramic (blue-painted earthenware)
Geography: Possibly from Amarna, Egypt
Date: c. 1550-1069 BC
Period: 18th-20th Dynasty, New Kingdom
Dimensions:
27.95 x 17.75 cm
Object number: 910.2.45
On view
Gallery Location:Galleries of Africa: Egypt
Description

Blue-painted pottery is the most characteristic and notable ceramic type of the Egyptian New Kingdom. The origin of Egyptian blue-painted decoration lies in the practice of decorating vessels with garlands of flowers on festive occasions.  The elite probably used metal ware decorated with real floral garlands.  But for large groups it may be that paint was used to provide a similar type of decoration. The basic colours are blue, black and red applied over a cream slip. Although often called Amarna ware, blue-painted pottery is known from the reign of Amenophis III (Dynasty XVIII) through the reign of Ramesses IV (Dynasty 20).

This ovoid jar has an outward flaring rim and two horizontal registers of blue-painted decoration, sloppily done. It dates to the late 18th or early 19th Dynasties. It is made of Nile silt with a cream slip. Limestone blowouts are visible on the surface. The first register under the rim contains a delineator band of blue outlined in black with a red horizontal line running through the centre. After a small gap there is a wide band on which a series of pendant blue lotus petals are outlined in black. The top and bottom of the lower panel are marked by delineator bands of blue outlined in black with a red horizontal midline.  Between the two bands are large pendant lotus petals rendered in blue paint outlined in black. In between the large pendant petals at the top of the panel are alternating vertical black and red lines with a light blue blob at the lower end, presumably representing stamens.  In between the large pendant petals at the bottom of the panel are blue lotus buds outlined in black pointing downwards.

Collection:
Egypt
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