Monumental vase, "Mansard" model - ROM2005_4044_3

ROM2005_4044_3

Monumental vase, "Mansard" model

Maker: Made by Sèvres Porcelain Factory (French, est. c.1740), painted by Joseph-Ferdinand Regnier, mounts made by Christofle (French, est. 1830)
Medium:Hard-paste porcelain with hand-painted underglaze cobalt blue decoration; bronze and silvered mounts
Geography: Sèvres, France; mounts made in Paris, France
Date: c.1855
Dimensions:
105 cm
Object number: 926.53.1.A
On view
Gallery Location:Samuel European Galleries
DescriptionOne of two models made, this vase is known as the "Mansard" model. It was designed by Jules Deterle, the Art Director at Sèvres Porcelain Factory. The hard-paste porcelain was moulded in five sections, and hand-painted by Joseph-Ferdinand Regnier in 1854. Christofle of Paris, a major manufacturer of silver and electroplate, produced the bronze and silvered mounts. In typical Victorian fashion, this vase combines scholarly historicism with the latest technical known-how. The decoration is an allegorical tribute to the City of Paris. The ship crest on the side supported by nereids or water nymphs is an heraldic reference to Paris. The oval medallion on the other side reproduces a releif of Diana, classical goddess of the hunt with her stag. At the time, this was believed to have been carved by Jean Goujon, a much-admired French Renaissance sculptor whose works beautified Paris. One of two models made, this vase is known as the "Mansard" model. It was designed by Jules Deterle, the Art Director at Sèvres Porcelain Factory. The hard-paste porcelain was moulded in five sections and hand-painted by Joseph-Ferdinand Regnier in 1854. Christofle of Paris, a major manufacturer of silver and electroplate, produced the bronze and silvered mounts. In typical Victorian fashion, this vase combines scholarly historicism with the latest technical known-how. The decoration is an allegorical tribute to the City of Paris. The ship crest on the side supported by nereids or water nymphs is an heraldic reference to Paris. The oval medallion on the other side reproduces a relief of Diana, classical goddess of the hunt with her stag. At the time, this was believed to have been carved by Jean Goujon, a much-admired French Renaissance sculptor whose works beautified Paris. For the handles, Christofle produced figures of Victory in cast bronze, partially silver-plated holding in place large classical ram's horns. This was the more elaborate of the two specifically decorated vases in the Mansard models displayed at the 1855 Exposition. Archival evidence documents its value as 14000 francs. Both Mansard vases were owned by Napoleon III and Empress Eugenie in 1856. The Emperor then presented the ROM's vase to Georges-Eugene Haussmann, Prefect of the Seine, whom he appointed to modernize Paris in June 1852.
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