Pugnose Shiner - ROM2008_9698_1

ROM2008_9698_1

Pugnose Shiner

Geography: Canada, Ontario: Kenty County, Dover Township. Lake St. Clair, Mitchell's Bay
Date: June 5, 1996
Dimensions:
total length=46 mm
Taxonomy
    • Attributes
    • Objects
    • Taxonomy
    • Kingdom: Animalia
    • Phylum: Chordata
    • Class: Actinopterygii
    • Order: Cypriniformes
    • Family: Cyprinidae
    • Genus: Notropis
    • SpecificEpithet: anogenus
Object number: 70263
Not on view
DescriptionThe Pugnose Shiner, Notropis anogenus, is a delicate, slender minnow (maximum length is about five centimetres) with an extremely small upturned mouth. Its overall colouration is silvery, with a dark stripe running laterally down the body from the snout. It lives in the marshy bays of lakes, ponds and in slow-moving streams where the water is clear. It is one of the rarest minnow species in northeastern North America, and one of 39 species of Cyprinidae (carps and minnows) that live in Ontario's fresh waters. The range of the Pugnose Shiner extends from Ontario south to Illinois and west to North Dakota. In Ontario, it is present in southwestern Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. The species has a limited distribution and it is often absent from apparently suitable habitat within its range. It is Threatened both provincially and nationally and the species has the general protection given by habitat sections of the Fisheries Act. Over approximately the last 50 years, the Pugnose Shiner has disappeared from Point Pelee and Rondeau Bay, Ontario, possibly caused by an increase in predators and competitors, and the introduction of the Eurasian watermilfoil, Myriophyllum spicatum. Eurasion watemilfoil is an aquatic plant that grows in dense mats just below the surface and crowds out native plants preferred by minnows. Although population size is not known, it is thought be declining slowly at remaining sites. Current threats include water pollution and siltation, and the removal of littoral vegetation, which provides important feeding and breeding habitat.
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