Boeotian black-figure large alabastron showing a siren and flying bird - ROM2018_16864_16

ROM2018_16864_16

Boeotian black-figure large alabastron showing a siren and flying bird

Maker: Attributed to the Horse-Bird Group
Medium:Wheel-thrown earthenware, slip-painted with incised detail
Geography: Made in Boeotia, Greece; findspot unknown
Date: about 580-570 BC
Period: Greek Archaic period
Dimensions:
21.8 x 9.7 cm
Object number: 919.5.91
Credit Line: Sigmund Samuel Collection
On view
Gallery Location:Gallery of Greece
Description

This large oil flask (large alabastron) is a Corinthian shape and is painted in a black-figure style which looks similar to Corinthian and Athenian decoration, but the clay suggests that it was actually manufactured in Boeotia. It shows a standing siren and a flying bird with rosettes in the background, which is a design typical on Corinthian vases.

Ure attributed this to the work of the painters of the Horse-Bird Group, which Beazley believed were all by the (Athenian) Painter of the Dresden Lekanis, who was Athenian. He suggested that the Attic vase painter emigrated from Athens to Boeotia.

Collection:
Greek World
Bibliography:
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